About The Show

The “Dr. Joe Show” is the longest running “call-in” radio program on science in Canadian history. Joe Schwarcz, Professor of Chemistry at McGill University in Montreal and director of the McGill University Office for Science and Society, began answering questions from listeners way back in 1980. Where does aspirin come from? What is genetic modification all about? Should we be concerned about “endocrine disruptors” in cosmetics? Can peppermint oil help with digestive problems? Questions such as these crop up with great regularity in people’s minds and Dr. Joe helps unravel the confusion with his easy-to-understand explanations. There are also interviews galore with leading scientists from around the world.

Dr. Joe has answers to your questions about the science of everyday life, and each week also entertains and informs listeners with a multitude of stories drawn from the world of science. You never know what is going to come up. Will it be a query about removing the mustache painted on a Barbie doll by a mischievous youngster, or a criticism of an inaccurate press report about the beneficial effects of chocolate?

Talk to the man behind the lab-coat Sundays at 3:00 on Montrteal’s News Talk Radio, CJAD 800.

You can also check out the Office for Science and Society website at www.mcgill.ca/oss and you can email Dr. Joe at joe.schwarcz@mcgill.ca

Blog

  • Cell phones and Belly Armour

    Fifty dollars for underwear is pretty expensive. But that’s what you have to pay if you want the fibers in your undies lined with silver. It isn’t a fashion statement, these boxer shorts are meant to protect men’s privates from electromagnetic radiation. Read More
  • When “Mayo” is not mayonnaise

    So, when is mayonnaise not mayonnaise? If you ask Unilever, producers of “Hellman’s Real Mayonnaise”, which is the market leader in the 11.3 billion dollar a year global mayonnaise industry, it’s when the product contains no eggs. Read More
  • Grape seed extract

    A modest amount of red wine reduces the risk of heart disease, possibly because of the polyphenols it contains. Grape seed extract contains the same polyphenols as found in wine and has therefore been widely marketed as a dietary supplement with claims of having a beneficial effect on the human cardiovascular system. Read More
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