UPDATE: Hwy. 40 reopens after debris falls from overpass onto a passing car

Transport Quebec has re-opened Hwy. 40 westbound in the West Island, after a large piece of concrete fell from an overpass earlier this afternoon.

A sliver of concrete fell from the side of the Henri-Bourassa E. overpass onto the roadway of Hwy. 40 westbound at around the noon hour today, forcing that stretch of road to close for close to three hours.

The chunks of concrete falling from the overpass landed on the hood of one passing car. Up to four or five other cars were damaged slightly. No one was injured.

Inspectors from Transport Quebec were quickly dispatched to the scene of the accident; they found that structurally, there was no danger of the overpass collapsing.

Sarah Bensadoun with Transport Quebec says its crews will take another look at the structure tonight, and will carry out inspections of similarly-designed structures throughout the province.

"We are not sure if this was caused because of the winter conditions," Bensadoun told reporters. "We are going to investigate, and as soon as we have the details of what caused the concrete to fall, for sure, we'll let you know."

Photos and video: Michel Boyer/CJAD

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  • 10
  1. Mike Libero posted on 01/13/2014 01:03 PM
    Really ? Roads and economy are not on top of priority list

    Lets keep talking about the Charter Bill 60
    1. Matthew posted on 01/14/2014 12:57 PM
      @Mike Libero And from 2003 were any of these problems another government's priority ?? Just saying ....
  2. paul posted on 01/13/2014 02:19 PM
    I saw what appears to be cement hanging from the overpass over the Decarie south, Sherbrooke exit, that leads to the boul Notre Dame.
    I think this is the next place to rain cement.
  3. Brian posted on 01/13/2014 02:37 PM
    Of course If they did not hire the same 4 people to hold one broom or shovel to watch one person work, they could afford better quality cement.
  4. vic posted on 01/13/2014 03:55 PM
    Thank the good lord no one was killed. Also thanks the Quebec government to keep spending money on such necessary things like the Charter of values and language laws. I mean who needs a viable infrastructure anyways.
  5. Ray S posted on 01/13/2014 04:18 PM
    If we want what passes for as the Quebec gov't to do something about falling concrete from our overpasses, we need to put kippas and crucifixes on these structures.

    That way, we'd be sure that action would be taken!
  6. joeN posted on 01/13/2014 05:23 PM
    Did they use the Quebecois method by riveting a chain link fence to the decaying portion of the overpass?
  7. Ainsley posted on 01/13/2014 09:26 PM
    I'm disgusted by how much Pauline Marois is spending on her stupid language police while our bridges are falling apart. I think it might be time to get her priorities straight.
    1. Gord posted on 01/14/2014 11:55 AM
      @Ainsley She has her priorities straight. Once her and her band of fools get their Nation (separate from Canada), the roads will be paved with gold!
  8. cujo posted on 01/14/2014 10:04 AM
    this incident might be a a blessing at the end of it, maybe the PQ and the Liberals will drop the religious talks and encourage all to show their faith and "pray" in every religion for the safety of all quebec drivers, especially those who drive over the 55th Ave overpass on cote de liesse, look underneath OMG.
    Travaux exécutés par Flinstone, Rubble, Slate & Associe
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