NDG man injured in early morning fire

An elderly man was badly burned about his face and arms when fire broke out in an apartment at 2480 Benny Crescent below Sherbrooke early this morning.

A spokesman for the Montreal fire department , District Operations Chief Martin Farmer, says the first firefighters on the scene spotted flames coming from a second floor apartment.

They managed to make their way inside and rescued an 80- year old man but he was badly burned about the face and arms and was rushed to hospital.

Several dozen people were evacuated from their apartments to the lobby, but the flames were contained to the single apartment, and they were allowed to return to their homes a short time later.

Farmer says it appears that cigarette smoking may have triggered the fire.

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