Verdun streets worst in city

Photo by Patrick Lejtenyi

A $50-million survey by the city on the state of its infrastructure revealed that Verdun has the worst roads in the city.

That actually came as a surprise to some Verdun residents, who point out that other parts of Montreal seem as bad, if not worse.

Lasalle resident Amanda Wheeler is in Verdun every day dropping off and picking up her kids, and drives through other parts of the west end regularly.

She begs to differ when told that Verdun has the worst roads in the city.

She says NDG's roads, and St-Jacques in particular, are far worse than anything she's seen in Verdun.

"The holes are massive," she says. "They're like craters. It's pretty bad."

Still, the study listed 10 per cent of Verdun's roads as being in "bad" or "very bad" shape.

While commercial arteries like Wellington street are decent, side streets are suffering as investment in road maintenance passes them by.

Other boroughs with lousy roads include Hochelaga-Maisonneuve, Lachine and Ahuntsic-Cartierville.

St-Leonard has the best roads, according to the study. 

And for the record, NDG's roads are generally considered good.

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  1. Mark posted on 05/11/2014 12:47 PM
    You want a bad street?? Try driving L'Acadie South between the Met and Jean Talon. If you don't serve to avoid the potholes, you must be in a tank. They're all over the road, sometimes 3 or 4 one after the other.
  2. Jim posted on 05/11/2014 01:43 PM
    How much roadwork can be done for $50 000 000; especially if you used contracted workers who are paid in an accountable manner? They needed to spend that much to know what is going on? No wonder we are in a deep financial debt.
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