Fur industry 'disgusted' with abuse allegations at mink farm

FUR COUNCIL OF CANADA

The Fur Council of Canada is coming forward after recent revelations that thousands of mink and dozens of foxes are living in filthy conditions at a fur farm in the community of St. Jude, near St. Hyacinthe in the Montérégie region.

The SPCA was alerted to the situation in May, and the Quebec wildlife ministry says it's monitoring the farm.

Alan Herscovici with the Fur Council says he's disgusted with the revelations. He says the industry has a code of conduct which it takes very seriously.

And there are reasons why.

"The only way to have a good quality fur is to give the animals excellent, excellent care," he says.

The SPCA alleges the animals are going without some basic needs, like water. Some of the animals are emaciated; still others nursing cuts and wounds.

Herscovici says some other fur farmers aren't happy with the St. Jude farm's owner.

"All the mink farmers feel...they want farms to be properly run they want consumers to feel totally confident as well, that when you're buying fur, you know that the animal has been well cared for," he says.

Herscovici adds he's confident that the the St. Jude farm is an aberration — and not representative of the industry as a whole.

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  1. Susan posted on 08/15/2014 06:28 PM
    How many more petitions have to be signed? How many more animals have to suffer before the people who have the power to change the laws stop dragging their feet? Who are our politicians trying to protect anyway? We want animals rights laws NOW with regular inspections and strict penalties for those who can't seem to understand that animals are not here to be exploited and abused, whether it be puppy mills, fur trade or food production! Thank-you to the journalists who bring these stories to our attention, as I am sure a lot of us were surprised to learn that these fur farms even existed in Quebec, however, we would like to read that the situation for these animals will soon improve because of the courage of one or more politicians actually passing laws to protect those who have no voice.
    1. Alexandra Suhner Isenberg posted on 08/18/2014 02:52 AM
      @Susan There are a lot of laws, and they are quite well enforced and this story is a rarity. Sadly with any industry there are going to be infractions but I think we should be proud that the fur farms in Canada are usually of a very, very high standard. Keep in mind that farmers don't make any money if they mistreat their animals, because poor living standards results in poor pelts. Most of them understand this basic concept (and care about their animals) and therefore treat them well.
  2. marguerite posted on 08/18/2014 10:56 AM
    I rarely see fur being worn these days in Montreal. Must be imported or worn by the odd person that is not out and about in public transport or in shopping areas. I think to many it's a symbol not of status but of suffering.

    More and more I think I'm going to go vegan because I see taking a life as so incredibly sad and wrong. Animals suffering while alive because they are seen
    as products is just sickening. Animals can feel stress and pain. Must be really awful to be at the mercy of sociopaths.
  3. Gil Theriault posted on 08/19/2014 02:37 PM
    You cannot ban driving because there is bad drivers out there. And you cannot ban fur farm because some don't respect the regulation. You either punish them or take their licence away. Just like you would do with bad drivers.
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